Nuturing knitting

In these days of instant gratification, using a loom may just be enough to inspire a child to start knitting.

This heart-warming story melted my heart and reminded me of the many times I have tried to teach my granddaughter to knit, without much success I might say.

Keira was about eight when she noticed me knitting (one of the famous Grammazoo shawls) for the very first time. She was fascinated and by hook or by crook, decided this was what she wanted to do.

She pestered me for wool and needles, and after the promised trip to the shops the next day, we arrived home with some lovely purple wool – her favourite colour – and a set of appropriately-sized knitting needles.

I thought a scarf for her poor, naked baby doll would be a good start and so we sat down, our heads and hands close together as we tried the first few stitches.

Perhaps I wasn’t such a good teacher or perhaps the attention span wasn’t long enough, but when she couldn’t manage the yarn and needles by herself, nah, “we will do some more later Grandma”.

She did pick it up a few more times when I was with her or knitting, but always with the same result. Perhaps the loom, where the result of your labour is a lot quicker, could be the answer and a way to start her off again. I may very well take one with me next school holidays as I am sure if she could produce a hat in next to no time, her interest may be piqued.

Have you ever tried to teach a young one to knit? What results did you have? What are your thoughts of starting with a loom?


Weekly pattern – Neck warmer with flower

Click image to download pattern

When you want something warm around your neck, but don’t want to wear a scarf, this pretty neck warmer is perfect. The pattern comes from www.loveknitting.com and calls for Alpaca wool, which would feel incredibly soft and luxurious against your skin. There are no itchy or scratchy with this yarn.

Grammazoo is running a little behind with her pattern testing due to the incredibly hot weather, but if you would like to trial the pattern and write a review, please feel free.

You can upload your photos and review in the comments below or at www.facebook.com/grammazooknits. Grammazoo will then add the review to her forthcoming pattern e-book under your name.



Weekly stitch – Wheat ear cable and reverse wheat ear cable

Consisting of just four rows, this easy cable has many uses such as a simple inset pattern in whatever garment you are knitting, as part of other cables in an Aran garment or perhaps an all-over pattern in an Afghan or cushion cover.

The samplers show the variation of the stitch which is decided by the placement of the cable needle while working the stitches.

Reverse wheat ear cable
Wheat ear cable

 

 

 

 

 

 

Each panel is made up of 17 stitches.

Row 1: (RS) P2, k13, p2
Row 2: K2, p13, k2
Row 3: P2, sl next 3 sts to cn and hold at back, k3, k3 from cn, k1 sl next 3 sts to cn and hold at front, k3, k3 from cn, p2
Row 4: K2, p13, k2
Repeat rows 1 to 4

To reverse the cable

Row 1: (RS) P2, k13, p2
Row 2: K2, p13, k2
Row 3: P2, sl next 3 sts to cn and hold at front, k3, k3 from cn, k1 sl next 3 sts to cn and hold at back, k3, k3 from cn, p2
Row 4: K2, p13, k2
Repeat rows 1 to 4

 

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